Latest Faketoshi says he conveniently ‘lost the hard drive’ containing billions in Bitcoin

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Just yesterday we told you how there was a new Faketoshi in town, staking a questionable claim to the Bitcoin BTC throne in a three-part blog series. 

Last night saw the release of parts two and three, where Faketoshi deep dives into his alleged creation of Bitcoin, explains why he is unable to move Satoshi Nakamoto’s coins, and reveals his real identity. 

But we still don’t buy it, and here’s why. 

A questionable name change

In the blog posts, Faketoshi says his birth name was Bilal Khalid, but notes this was changed by deed poll to James Bilal Caan after seeing James Khan on BBC’s Dragon’s Den (a popular TV show in the UK). 

“After the creation of Bitcoin and having chosen the alias name of Satoshi Nakamoto, thanks in part to Hal Finney, I was watching the movie The Godfather when I saw James Caan,” Faketoshi explains, “It was at that moment I thought, ‘I am the godfather of digital cash’.”

“I also saw UK serial entrepreneur James Caan on the BBC series Dragon’s Den. I realized I could relate to him in that he was an Asian who had also changed his name, which is very uncommon. And the Dragon’s name reminded me of my mom calling me James and Khan,” he adds.

He says he shared his thoughts about changing his name with his wife, but that she insisted he kept his original name, too. 

So, we are to believe that Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator(s) of Bitcoin – arguably one of the most influential peer-to-peer networks known to humankind – changed his name after being inspired by a BBC Dragon?

Surely someone with such technological prowess would be less swayable to make what seems like a childish, and random, life-changing decision? Maybe not.

Satoshi’s coins

As the quest to reveal Nakamoto’s identity has picked up pace over the years, the one bit of proof that would help identify the real creator(s) has remained the same.

Bitcoin‘s real creator owns a sizeable fortune: 980,000 BTC or $10,4billion according to today’s exchange rate. 

These coins can only be controlled by Nakamoto, which would mean that if Caan really was who he claims to be, he’d be able to move the coins.

But think again because Caan conveniently explains he lost the hard drive containing his Bitcoin holdings when he sent a laptop for repair several years ago.

“My everything was in that hard drive! It was military-grade encrypted and password-protected, so I was overly confident – to the point of being arrogant – that the techie guys could not have access to my HDD data.  That’s why I left the HDD inside the laptop and didn’t take it out. The laptop came back by courier a few days later and it contained a new HDD and, of course, the bitcoins weren’t there!,” he claims.

“But what could I do? I tried to go into my old laptop and see if I could do some magic, but I could not. At that time, retrieval software was limited and I was having a dose of my own medicine.  In hindsight, I should have had bought a £30 GBP printer to at least print my private keys,” adds Caan.

Although we have to commend Caan’s (if that’s his real name) efforts for attempting to deceive us with this laughable explanation, it all falls short.